Breastfeeding Beyond…#keepbritainbf

Breastfeeding beyond what? The first month? The first six months? The first year?

With Jake, I managed exclusive breastfeeding for 4 months, then I went into have a knee operation and it seemed that after the anaesthetic and not being able to feed to 24 hours and not ever being able to express much, my supply dwindled, so I combined fed. Then when Jake was 7 months old i had to go in for more surgery, and in turn had to have chemotherapy so had no choice but to stop.

I would have probably carried on until he was one had I been able to, but I am a firm believer that some, is better than none, no matter how long the “some” is. Am I disappointed that I had to stop? Yes. Do I feel guilty about it? No.

Yesterday, I was asked how long I intend to breastfeed for. I said at least six months, then I might combine formula and breast along with solids, or I might just stick with breast. I don’t know, I’ll decide when the time arrives.

What I do know is that I will carry on for as long as it feels right,as long as he is happy and healthy, that is what is the most important thing. I have had some wonderful advice from other mums about feeding and I think that these days it’s not the automatic response to just switch straight to formula if baby isn’t gaining as quickly as you might like.

Jake was a small baby for a long time and then all of a sudden, he caught up, and now he’s taller than most of his friends the same age. I think Zack is going the same way. When I raised my concerns with the GP at his 8 week check, she said I had nothing to worry about, and actually wrote in his red book that she had told me to carry on feeding.

He’s happy, I’m happy. He’s healthy, that also makes me happy. For now, that’s more than enough.

Thank you for reading.  Please complete the following to enter the competition for the Keep Britain Breastfeeding Grand Prize:

Leave a comment on this blog telling me how long you fed/are intending to feed for.

For extra entries:

Go to the Life, Love and Lollipops Facebook page and “like” and  ”share” the hunt with your Facebook friends.

Tweet the following: I’m taking part in the Keep Britain Breastfeeding Scavenger hunt via @rozzibee http://wp.me/p1Fanz-5Y #keepbritainbf

Leave a separate comment for each thing you have done.

Happy Hunting!

If you have enjoyed reading, you can find other bloggers taking part in the scavenger hunt here:

Where Roots Flourish

Breast4babies

Ponderings of a Doula

Twinkle Mummy

Fi Peacock’s Blog

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Naomi’s Perfumes – FM Group Review

I was recently sent some products to review from a lovely lady called Naomi who works for the FM Group. FM (Federico Mahora) is an exclusive designer brand expanding rapidly throughout the world. Their products are marketed  via a channel of independent agents (a bit like Avon), instead of using shops, models, celebrities, and TV ads.

What I was sent:

  • Nail Lacquer (Lilac) £5.49
  • Mineral Loose Eyeshadow (Ruby Pink) £7.99
  • Foundation sample – £0.50
  • 2 sample perfumes – £0.50 each (available in 30ml bottles for £11.99)
Naomi asked me which perfumes I usually like, and I said that I wear 212 Sexy and Paul Smith Floral. One of the samples she sent came from the same group as 212 Sexy, and the other from the same group as Flowerbomb.They both smelt lovely, but if I had to pick a favourite it would be the FM32 which was the same group as the 212 Sexy. The perfumes are long lasting and at £11.99 for a 30ml bottle, it’s really good value for money.
The foundation feels lovely on, gives good coverage but doesn’t feel to heavy. Again, £12.99 for a 30ml bottle is a good price for it.
I used the nail polish when I went to a wedding as the colour matched my dress quite well. It dried quickly and lasted for a long time and is £5.49 for 10ml.
The eye-shadow goes on very smoothly, feels silky and looks lovely. The only thing I would say is to make sure you take the wand out slowly, as the first time I opened it some of the powder came out. £7.99 for 10g.
What I also liked about these products was the packaging. it doesn’t make you feel as if you are buying value products as they look so nice.

  • Hoover Freshener (Splendid Violet) – £4.50 for 2 cartridges
I was also sent some hoover fresheners. We have two dogs in our house, and whenever I hoover, I’m always paranoid about the dust smell. You put the freshener near the exhaust filter and the hot air circulation releases the aroma into the room. It does leave a lovely smell. They are £4.50 for two cartridges.
You can contact Naomi on Facebook or via email. Naomi also does parties in the Southend, Essex area. If you host a party, you will receive a 30ml bottle of perfume of your choice, free of charge.
*I was sent these products to review, but no other payment was received and I have not been told what to write. 

Things Not to Say to a Breastfeeding Mother #keepbritainbf

As I mentioned in last week’s post, I have never have anyone say anything negative to me whilst feeding in public. That’s not to say I’ve never had anything negative said to me at all. Just the other day, someone was feeding Zack a bottle of expressed milk and said “Oh this milk looks quite weak”, as well as the comment from someone else “Oh when can he have a bottle? I’d give him a bottle if it was me”.

And that got me thinking. There are lots of posts this week about breastfeeding support and where to get it, so I didn’t want to duplicate that. I thought I would look at things from a different angle, and took to Facebook to ask friends what negative things have been said to them in a bid to educate people what NOT to say to a breastfeeding mum. I was actually quite shocked by some of the things I was told.

“My mother-in-law (who never breastfed) told me I was being cruel to my daughter by breastfeeding her and not giving her water (which she wouldn’t take at all) because she was always thirsty. I tried to explain she was crying because of colic not because she was thirsty and wouldn’t take water and that the foremilk is designed to quench their thirst and the hindmilk to satisfy their hunger but it was like talking to…well a moron really.”

“It winds me up something rotten the comments I get when I breastfeed in public and refuse to inconvenience myself by hiding away. The other week I breastfed on the bus and one guy shouted out ‘oh my god is she actually tit feeding her baby on the bus’ which was met by other mutterings of ‘ewww’ or ‘gross’ under their breaths. I won’t let people like them stop me but it does wind me up”

“Do you have to do that here?”

“My mother-in-law told me I was selfish for breastfeeding because apparently its a dads right to be able to feed his daughter and to decide if they should be bottle fed or not.”

  • “Are you sure he’s getting enough milk?
  • Are you sure your milk is nutritious enough?
  • I think he’s feeding too often / little / long / short.
  • You should top up with formula!
  • Do you want me to go buy some formula?
  • Why don’t you just top up with formula you’ll get more sleep / break / time
  • He/ she looks small. You should top up with formula.
  • You look tired. You should top up with formula.
  • Your nipples are sore? Top up with formula!
  • I don’t know why you bother when you could feed him formula.
  • What? He’s feeding again?? You should give him formula!
  • Formula fed babies sleep more!
  • I WANT to hold/ cuddle/ feed the baby but YOU’re breast feeding him all the time.
  • He’s crying because he’s not getting enough milk / it’s not nutritious enough.
  • Can’t you put something over the babies head?
  • There is no benefit in breastfeeding after 6 months.
  • After a certain age it’s more for the mother than for the child.
  • Can’t you go face a wall / sit in the bathroom / toilet / dark hidey hole / stuffy changing room …
  • Isn’t he/ she too old / big for that.
  • Mothers who breast feed after a certain age get enjoyment out of it ( hint pedophilia )
  • You’re preventing dad from having a relationship with his child because you’re breastfeeding
  • You’re fostering separation anxiety
  • He only wants you for your milk
  • It’s your fault he doesn’t want to come to me”

“My only negative experience was when I had my son and the nurse tried to force him to feed by grabbing my boob and his head forcing him to feed. He still refused to latch until he was ready but it made me feel like crap and since then I always follow my gut instinct and not what they say,they don’t know everything!”

“For me it was the pressure to do it, I really wanted to but struggled. I feel like focus should be put on the positives of breastfeeding rather than the negatives of formula as I felt like a failure when it didn’t work out as I hoped it would and have spoken to lots of friends who have felt the same”

“I really wanted to do it, I managed to express while she was in hospital and did a mix of breast, expressed and formula for about 3 or 4 weeks. I found the midwives and my health visitors were really supportive of me breastfeeding and when I gave up. I honestly don’t think I’d try to breastfeed next time round though. In my case I’m sure some of the problems were down to her being premature”

“I felt with my youngest that everyone telling me she would sleep better if I gave her formula was really really annoying especially as I was exhausted and irritable anyway! I’m not 100% I would breast feed our next baby even though I enjoyed feeding both of my girls purely because I struggled so much with not having more than 4 hours sleep in one go for about 7 months”

“I really wanted to breastfeed and really tried but she just wouldn’t latch on, I felt horrible giving her formula but really had no choice”

Some of the things that people have had said to them have really shocked me. It amazes me how people think they have the right to make that decision for you, or make you feel bad for the decision that you have made. Being a new mum is difficult enough without others trying to make you feel bad.

I would also like to say that there is plenty of support out there for you if you feel you need it.

Thank you for reading.  Please complete the following to enter the competition for the Keep Britain Breastfeeding Grand Prize:

Leave a comment on this blog telling me if you have ever had anything negative said to you.

For extra entries:

Go to the Life, Love and Lollipops Facebook page and “like” and  ”share” the hunt with your Facebook friends.

Tweet the following: I’m taking part in the Keep Britain Breastfeeding Scavenger hunt via @rozzibee http://wp.me/p1Fanz-5Y #keepbritainbf

Leave a separate comment for each thing you have done.

Happy Hunting!

If you have enjoyed reading, you can find other bloggers taking part in the scavenger hunt here:

Breastfeeding in England

mummyslittlepeeps

Diary of the Milkshake Mummy

Smiling Like Sunshine

Where Roots and Wings Entwine

Breastfeeding in Public #keepbritainbf

The first time I breast fed in public was at the register office when we went to register Jake at 12 days old. I was a bit nervous, but I got over it very quickly.

I’ve always been a bit nervous about someone coming up to me and asking me to stop feeding, or telling me it’s inappropriate, but luckily it has never happened. And if it did, I’m pretty sure I would tear strips off them, and if I didn’t, my hubby would. In fact, the only time someone has ever commented on my breastfeeding was when Jake was tiny and I was sat on a bench outside a shopping centre feeding him and a lady came up to me and said “Well done!” and carried on her way.

It can be quite daunting feeding in public for the first time, but don’t let it put you off. It does get easier.

  • If you feel nervous, make sure you have someone with you for the first time.
  • Choose clothing appropriately. I tend to prefer loose tops that I can lift up, then I pull it down to his face so that no breast is exposed but I can still see him and he can see me. On the odd occasion that I have a top that I need to pull down, I have a muslin or scarf handy to make me feel less exposed. Some women like to wear a vest top under a loose fitting top.
  • Don’t feel like you need to hide away in a toilet. You wouldn’t want to eat in a public loo, so neither would your baby.
  • Don’t be made to feel uncomfortable feeding in public. The Equality Act 2010 has made it illegal for anyone to ask a breastfeeding woman to leave a public place such as a cafe, shop or public transport.
  • Remember, breastfeeding is completely natural and there is nothing inappropriate about it. If someone has a problem with it, that is exactly what it is – their problem. Smile, nod and carry on.

Congratulations. You have found the scavenger hunt logo. This week, I also have an extra competetion to win a £15 voucher to use at BoobieMilk.

Thank you for reading.  Please complete the following to enter the competition for the Keep Britain Breastfeeding Grand Prize:

Leave a comment on this blog telling me what your top tip for feeding in public is.

For extra entries:

Go to the Life, Love and Lollipops Facebook page and “like” and  ”share” the hunt with your Facebook friends.

Tweet the following: I’m taking part in the Keep Britain Breastfeeding Scavenger hunt via @rozzibee http://wp.me/p1Fanz-5Y #keepbritainbf

Leave a separate comment for each thing you have done.

Happy Hunting!

If you have enjoyed reading, you can find other bloggers taking part in the scavenger hunt here:

A New Addition
Edspire
Mummy Constant
Radical Ramblings
Life Happens so Smile

The Benefits of Breastfeeding – #keepbritainbf

When I got pregnant, with both of the boys, in fact, even before I got pregnant, I knew I would be breastfeeding. Or, at the very least I was going to give it a damn good go. There was no question in my mind, it’s just what I was going to do.

When Jake was seven and a half months old, I stopped breastfeeding him completely, as I knew I would be going into hospital for a week to have surgery, and following that, I had six months of chemotherapy to go through. At that point, breastfeeding was no longer an option, and although I was sad to stop, I’m glad I managed to do it for as long as I did.

This time, I don’t know how long I will breastfeed for, but I am hoping to stop when I feel ready to, not because I have to. Already, I am being asked “When can you give him a bottle?” The answer: “I CAN give him one now, but he is a breastfed baby, so isn’t having them yet.” I’m very tempted to get myself, or Zack a t-shirt from Lactivist and then maybe I won’t get asked again.

As well as being free and convenient (no need to prepare bottles in a sleepy daze at 3am, or carrying them around with you when you are out and about) breast-feeding also has health benefits for both mum and baby.

Benefits for babies

  • less chance of diarrhoea and vomiting and having to go to hospital as a result
  • fewer chest and ear infections and having to go to hospital as a result
  • less chance of being constipated
  • less likelihood of becoming obese and therefore developing type 2 diabetes and other illnesses later in life
  • less chance of developing eczema
  • Any amount of breastfeeding has a positive effect. The longer you breastfeed, the longer the protection lasts and the greater the benefits.
  • Infant formula doesn’t give your baby the same ingredients or provide the same protection. Breast milk adapts to meet your baby’s changing needs.

Health benefits for you

Breastfeeding doesn’t only benefit your baby. It benefits your health too. Breastfeeding is good for mums as it:

  • lowers your risk of getting breast and ovarian cancer
  • naturally uses up to 500 calories a day
  • saves money – infant formula, the sterilising equipment and feeding equipment can be costly
  • can help to build a strong bond between you and your baby
  • Exclusive breastfeeding can also delay the return of your periods.

*benefits taken from the NHS website

I love the bond that it gave me and Jake, and that it’s giving to me and Zack. I love the way Zack looks at me with those big blue eyes of his, and that I know that if no one else can, that I can always comfort him. It’s also very handy to be able to sit in my bed with him swaddled, then feed him to sleep and put him down in his crib. I know some people think that breastfed babies don’t sleep as well at night, but Zack easily goes five or six hours before waking for a feed, and then he just comes and lies next to me and feeds.

I love breastfeeding, and I’m not planning on stopping any time soon!

If you have enjoyed reading, you will find more bloggers taking part in the scavenger hunt here:

Thank you for reading.  Please complete the following to enter the competition for the Keep Britain Breastfeeding Grand Prize:

Leave a comment on this blog telling me what made you decide you wanted to breastfeed.

For extra entries:

Go to the Life, Love and Lollipops Facebook page and “like” and  “share” the hunt with your Facebook friends.

Tweet the following: I’m taking part in the Keep Britain Breastfeeding Scavenger hunt via @rozzibee http://wp.me/p1Fanz-5Y #keepbritainbf

Leave a separate comment for each thing you have done.

Happy Hunting!